IMPROVING SERVICES

We improve services because everyone should have access to good quality facilities, training opportunities and comfortable care.

We focus on improving:
Equipment and facilities
Services for female amputees
Access to training


Improving equipment and facilities

Through working closely with in-country prosthetists and technicians we have learnt that many of the centres we work with simply do not have the facilities or the equipment to be able to provide amputees with adequate support.

Since 2020, we’ve been working alongside partners to work out exactly what they need in order to enhance services and improve amputee experiences at their centres.


Group of training prosthetists receiving a donation

We are hoping to enhance prosthetic and orthotic services for people in need. We are grateful to Legs4Africa and all its supporters for their wonderful donations that are putting us back in prosthetic fabrication

Serge Alladagbe

Prosthetist
A2D Services, Benin

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Improving services for female amputees

In sub-Saharan Africa, the prosthetics and orthotics sector is hugely male-dominated. According to some, this can result in fewer female amputees accessing services as they are reluctant to go through the invasive procedures with a male prosthetist.

In 2020, we launched a new scholarship scheme which aims to enable women with limb-loss to increase their employability and build careers in the prosthetics industry, while challenging norms and stigma around gender and disability. We hope that through this scheme we can not only improve female representation within the sector, but we can also ensure more women are accessing the services and support they need to get back on their feet.

The scheme enables women with limb-loss to enrol in a one-year Certificate Course in Lower-Limb Prosthetics at TATCOT (Tanzania Training Centre for Orthopaedic Technologists).



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There is an enormous need to develop the field of prosthetics in my country because of the high number of people with disabilities and we have very few professionals. Through TATCOT I have been able to lay a foundation in achieving greater things.

Winnie, scholarship recipient

Improving access to training

Across sub-Saharan there are not enough trained prosthetists and technicians to meet the needs of people with limb differences. When we first started working in The Gambia, there was only one trained prosthetist in the entire country - Gabu. 

As well as offering training scholarships to female amputees, we now also provide grants for continuing professional development training and higher education courses in Prosthetics and Orthotics.

In 2021, Morrow finished his three year course in Prosthetics at the Orthopaedic Training Centre in Nsawam, Ghana. With this qualification, Morrow became The Gambia’s second qualified prosthetist. He is now able to commence work at Banjul Mobility Centre and he will be available to take over when Gabu retires.

Recycling legs across the UK, Europe, Australia, Canada and the USA